Nov. 15 Online Service

Oconee Street UMC Online Service
November 15, 2020

Full Service

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Welcome

Pastor Laura Patterson

Prelude

“Fairest Lord Jesus”
Maxine Easom, piano

Invocation

Sarah Sumners

Opening Hymn

“Lord, Whose Love in Humble Service”
First Plymouth Church (Lincoln, Nebraska)

Gospel Reading: Matthew 25:14-30

Sarah Sumners

Sermon: “Everyone’s Favorite Sermon Topic!”

The Rev. Laura Patterson

Anthem

“Beautiful Savior”
Saint Olaf Choir

Prayer / The Lord’s Prayer

Sarah Sumners

Closing Hymn

“A Charge to Keep I Have”
Grace Community Church (Sun Valley, California)

Benediction

Pastor Laura Patterson

Postlude

“Come Thou Fount of Every Blessing”
Maxine Easom, piano

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Sermon: Does Jesus really want us to be the shrewd manager?

teachings_of_jesus_31_of_40-_parable_of_the_unjust_steward-_jan_luyken_etching-_bowyer_bibleThe Parable of the Shrewd Manager is one of the more confusing parables in the Bible. On the surface, it seems strange that Jesus would praise the manager who wasted his possessions. But this parable is really about not accumulating our worldly possessions. We live in two worlds — this world and the world of Jesus. May God help us to see that the world of Jesus subverts the income balance sheet of this world.

Sermon *Gospel reading not included, please read below

Luke 16: 1-13
Jesus told his disciples: “There was a rich man whose manager was accused of wasting his possessions. So he called him in and asked him, ‘What is this I hear about you? Give an account of your management, because you cannot be manager any longer.’

“The manager said to himself, ‘What shall I do now? My master is taking away my job. I’m not strong enough to dig, and I’m ashamed to beg—I know what I’ll do so that, when I lose my job here, people will welcome me into their houses.’

“So he called in each one of his master’s debtors. He asked the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’

“‘Nine hundred gallons of olive oil,’ he replied.

“The manager told him, ‘Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it four hundred and fifty.’

 “Then he asked the second, ‘And how much do you owe?’

“‘A thousand bushels of wheat,’ he replied.

“He told him, ‘Take your bill and make it eight hundred.’

“The master commended the dishonest manager because he had acted shrewdly. For the people of this world are more shrewd in dealing with their own kind than are the people of the light. I tell you, use worldly wealth to gain friends for yourselves, so that when it is gone, you will be welcomed into eternal dwellings.

“Whoever can be trusted with very little can also be trusted with much, and whoever is dishonest with very little will also be dishonest with much. So if you have not been trustworthy in handling worldly wealth, who will trust you with true riches? And if you have not been trustworthy with someone else’s property, who will give you property of your own?

“No one can serve two masters. Either you will hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve both God and money.”

“Too Weak to Dig, Too Proud to Beg”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Luke 16: 1-9
Sept. 18, 2016