Sermon: The Folly of the Cross

Church means many things to different people. But Paul keeps returning the focus of the church to the cross.

But the cross is often used by people use for their own personal gain. Paul warns about this. The cross is not something that can be humanized. It’s a gift from God that allows us to see the world beyond a human perspective.

In the midst of our path in the world, God has placed the stumbling block of the cross. When we encounter it, we might have to do something others deem foolish, but is right in the eyes of God.

Sermon: The Folly of the Cross

“The Folly of the Cross”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
1 Corinthians 1:18-25
Feb. 3, 2019

Listen to The Word in Song: “What the Lord Has Done In Me

Sermon: What Unites Us

Paul goes to the church of Corinth and finds the Corinthians divided. The cause of their division was over who baptized them.

Although the church today does not argue over baptism, a key issue often divides Christians — political ideology. Many people take pride belonging to churches that claim to be “progressive” or emphasizing “conservative family values.”

What would Paul’s message be us? The same it was to the Corinthians. What divides us doesn’t matter. The important thing is what unites us — the power of the cross. And despite human attempts to take control of the cross and shape its message, the power of the cross is unlike any other. It does not depend on us, it depends on God.

And we have been invited to participate in that power — but we cannot manipulate it.

Sermon: “What Unites Us”

“What Unites Us”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
1 Corinthians 1:10-18
Jan. 27, 2019

Sermon: Mary’s radical vision

When Mary trusted God to bear Jesus, she was taking a major risk. Mary was defying family, community, religious and government standards, but had faith in God that she is doing what is right.

Mary initiated a radical new vision of what her life and our life could be — God in flesh among us. Her whole life prepared her to say “Yes” when God asked her to do something important. Mary teaches me to wonder, “What is holding me back from bearing God into the world?”

God invites each of us in each moment, relationship, and heartbreak in the world as it is, to participate in the world as it should be — transformed in God’s word. We cannot stop it.

Sermon

“Mary’s radical vision”
Sermon by The Rev. Bonnie Osei-Frimpong
Luke 1:46-55
Dec. 16, 2018 • Third Sunday of Advent

Sermon: The Gift You See is the Gift You Get

The “Parable of the Talents” (Matthew 25:14-30) is often one of the stories people who are disaffected with Christianity use to criticize our faith. And at a surface glance, that criticism is warranted. What kind of master gets mad when his servant attempts to save and preserve what is given to him?

But the parable is not about saving or producing wealth. Rather, the parable is about how we see God. In the story, the master does not get mad at his third servant until the servant communicates his mistrust and fear of the master. How do we see God? Do we see God as vengeful master, or as a loving Creator?

How we use God’s gifts relies on how we see God.

“What You See is What You Get”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Matthew 25: 14-30
Oct. 14, 2018

Sermon: We’re One But Not the Same

The past two weeks have been difficult for our country. It has opened up wounds and showcased the divisiveness of our politics. People on both sides of the fence demean and degrade the other side. Many of us surround ourselves in “echo chambers,” where we only hear opinions that support our own beliefs.

This runs counter to God’s call to the church. In Ephesians 4:2, God tells us to lead a life of “humility and gentleness, patience, love and unity.” On this World Communion Sunday, churches from all over the globe are demonstrating such unity. Our differences are not  a weakness, but rather our strength. The church is a diverse global body — formed by God — and knit together by the Holy Spirit.

Let’s work to show the humility by honoring the human dignity in each person. Demonstrate gentleness by showing kindness to each other. Show patience by loving and understanding those with whom we disagree. Showing humility, gentleness, patience and love will lead towards a unity of all people.

“We’re One, but We’re Not the Same”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Ephesians 4: 1-16
Oct. 7, 2018 • World Communion Sunday

Sermon: The Shouting Outside

As Jesus and his disciples were heading to Jericho, a blind man stops Jesus and asks for healing. The disciples are frustrated with the man and “rebuke” him.

Why would the disciples be so upset? By this time, they should understand how Jesus operates, healing all who need healing. They are focused on the destination, but Jesus is focused on the path.

We are much like the disciples. How often do we ignore human suffering that gets in the way of our path? Walking by the homeless person in the way of our path to work? Not listening to the person of a different political bent who gets in the way of our path to like-minded discussion. Ignoring the person who needs emotional support who gets in the way of our daily tasks.

God calls us to follow the path of Jesus. But it’s not an easy path. It’s a path in which we will encounter pain and suffering. Will we walk the path like Jesus?

“The Shouting Outside”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Mark 10: 46-52
Sept. 23, 2018

Sermon: Head of the Class

As James and John were walking with Jesus, they asked him if they could sit at his left and right . At first glance, it appears selfish, but what their desires come from a natural human instinct — ambition.

We all have ambitions, especially in our professions. But there are two types of ambition. One type of ambition involves us achieving fame, financial success and glory. If we pursue our careers for this type of selfish ambition, it will undoubtedly leave us empty.

The other type of ambition involves us pursuing what we love to inspire others, to help our community and in our little way, change the world. This is the type of ambition that God wants us to pursue. The type of ambition with which Jesus lived his life.

“Head of the Class”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Mark 10: 35-45
Sept. 16, 2018

Sermon: Shoving Camels ’til Kingdom Come

Jesus tells us to give up all our possessions and follow him.

It sounds severe, but what does it really mean? Are we really supposed to give up everything? Perhaps we are to use our talents to do good, not to make profit. Perhaps we are to use our money to do good, not to selfishly spoil ourselves. For true wealth comes in our power and ability to help others.

But even those small steps is a radical change from our capitalist society. However, the possessions we are encouraged to keep — the clutter we continue to gather — is keeping us from following Jesus. It’s impossible to have a selfish view about money and wholeheartedly follow Jesus.

Fully heeding Jesus’ words will ruin our life. But it’s the best thing that can happen to us.

Note: Due to technical difficulties, the first three minutes of sermon, including Gospel reading, were not recorded.

“Shoving Camels ’til Kingdom Come”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Mark 10: 17-31
Sept. 9, 2018

Click to listen to The Word in Song, “Come Unto Me

Sermon: Savoring Peace

Jesus shows a different side of himself in Mark 9:42-50, talking about judgement and describing hell. His “fire and brimstone” words here often drive people away from the church. But why is Jesus so angry?

Prior to these events, Jesus talks about children being the most pure of heart, and the most holy. And anyone who gets in between a child and God will suffer the most dire consequences.

Even in this day, we see people using God to manipulate and abuse children. We see children suffering from war, genocide and persecution. And Jesus’ words of judgement are necessary for those suffering persecution.

But what can we do? One, we need to pray for those suffering. Two, we need to reach out to those who are suffering, and give them the connection they need to find peace and the true love of God.

“Savoring Peace”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Mark 9:42-50
Aug. 26, 2018

Click here to listen to The Word in Song, “If God Be For Us.”

Sermon: Transfiguring Vision

When the disciples see Jesus for who he really is, God tells the disciples to listen to him.

That voice of God also encourages us that God will not leave us alone in the valley.

Down in the valley of the Twitter-verse, the 25-hour news cycle, there’s so much information, but very little truth and wisdom. If we don’t have it on a much larger framework to hang on — an idea of the world as love — then all that information is worthless.

“Transfiguring Vision”
Sermon by The Rev. Joe Gunby
Mark 9:2-10
Aug. 19, 2018